Dr Limor Shifman

 Dr Limor Shifman

Limor Shifman is a lecturer at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where she investigates various aspects of Internet-based humour, including humour and gender, humour about computers and technology, online 'joke memes', and political online humour.

Profile

Limor Shifman (PhD Hebrew University of Jerusalem) is a lecturer at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Her scholarly work focuses on two socio-cultural arenas: humour and communication technologies, as well as on their intertwining. Her studies span film, television and Internet, mainly in Israel, the US, and the UK. As a research fellow at the OII, Limor launched a novel ongoing research project about cyber-humour.

She currently investigates various aspects of Internet-based humour, including humour and gender, humour about computers and technology, the international spread and translation of online 'joke memes', and political online humour.

Research interests

Internet-based humour, evolution of communication technologies, gender

Positions held at the OII

  • Research Associate, October 2008 - August 2010
  • Research Fellow, January 2005 - December 2007

Research

Past projects

  • Cyber-humour: the end of humour as we know it?

    January 2005 - December 2007

    Combining quantitative and qualitative methods to investigate the implications of the Internet on humorous communication (eg political, technology and gender based humour) starting from the senders of humorous messages and ending in receiving procedures.

Publications

Articles

Chapters

  • Shifman, L. and Blondheim, M. (2008) From the Spider to the Web: Innis' Ecological Approach to the Evolution of Communication Technologies. In: M.Blondheim and R.Watson (Eds) The Toronto School of Communication Theory: Interpretations, Extensions, Applications. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, pp. 339-356.

Webcasts

  • Cyber-Humour: The End of Humour as We Know It?

    Cyber-Humour: The End of Humour as We Know It?

    Recorded on: 23 March 2006 Duration: 00:48:58

    To what extent does the Internet function as a facilitator of new humorous forms and topics? How do these relate to characteristics of the Internet such as interactivity, multimedia and global reach? What are their social and cultural implications?