Dr Kathryn Eccles

 Dr Kathryn Eccles

Kathryn Eccles has research interests in the impact of new technologies on scholarly behaviour and research, particularly in the Humanities.

Email: kathryn.eccles@oii.ox.ac.uk

Tel: +44 (0)1865 612338

Profile

Kathryn's research interests lie primarily in the Digital Humanities. Her research is highly interdisciplinary, cutting across several thematic areas, ranging from the impact of the re-organisation of cultural heritage and higher education in the digital world to broader debates surrounding the human and social aspects of innovation and technological change. Her current research activities fall into four main areas: the impact of new technologies on public interactions with arts and cultural heritage; the potential and impact of new technologies to support behaviour change, social capital and enhanced wellbeing; understanding the scope, potential and impact of crowdsourcing; and the impact of new technologies on scholarly activity and behaviour.

She recently held an AHRC Early Career Fellowship, which she used to examine the role of crowdsourcing in the arts, in particular, the potential of new information and communication technologies to promote public engagement with and awareness of museum collections, and to elicit new information about users and usage. The research focused on a key case study, Your Paintings, an important collaboration between the Public Catalogue Foundation and the BBC.

Kathryn joined the OII in 2008 to work on the Digitised Resources: A Usage and Impact Study, a JISC-funded project that led to the creation of a free web resource, the Toolkit for the Impact of Digitised Scholarly Resources. She subsequently completed research in the field of Digital Humanities for the Oxford e-Social Science (OeSS) project, and probed the role of e-Infrastructures in the creation of global virtual research communities as part of the eResearch2020 project.

Kathryn completed her DPhil in Modern History at the University of Oxford in 2007. Her historical research interests lie in Modern British social and cultural history, particularly around the themes of gender, identity and education, research methods and digital history.

Research interests

digital humanities, crowdsourcing, cultural heritage, arts and cultural industries, behaviour change, wellbeing, e-humanities, digital history, e-research, history, gender, education

Positions held at the OII

  • Research Fellow, January 2014 -
  • AHRC Research Fellow, October 2012 - December 2013
  • Research Fellow, July 2008 - December 2011

Research

Current projects

Past projects

  • A Museum Without Walls: Realising the Potential of Crowdsourcing in the Arts

    October 2012 - June 2013

    This AHRC funded project will study the impact of an innovative crowdsourcing initiative on Your Paintings, an important new digital art collection hosted by the BBC.

  • Digital Impacts: A Synthesis Report and Workshop

    February - May 2011

    This project was designed to synthesize the evidence about the impact that digital resources are having on various audiences, and how resource providers have stepped up efforts to embed resources into the practices of communities.

  • Humanities Information Practices

    February - November 2010

    Many humanities scholars are enthusiastic users of digital resources, however there is a potential mismatch between what (and how) resources are offered, and how scholars might use them. How should they be designed to ensure maximum use by scholars?

  • eResearch 2020

    February 2009 - February 2010

    Aiming to better understand the organizational, collaborative and technological developments in e-Infrastructures which are effective in supporting virtual research organizations in different fields.

  • Digitised Resources: A Usage and Impact Study

    June 2008 - April 2009

    This project combined quantitative and qualitative indicators to measure the impact of online scholarly resources and to develop a best practices toolkit that allows assessment of the impact of digitisation projects by researchers and funding bodies.

  • OeSS: The Oxford e-Social Science Project

    October 2005 - March 2012

    The Oxford e-Social Science project aims to understand how e-Research projects negotiate various social, ethical, legal and organizational forces and constraints, in order to help researchers avoid these problems when building scientific collaborations.

Publications

Articles

Chapters

  • Eccles, K. and Greg, A. (2014) Your Paintings Tagger: Crowdsourcing descriptive metadata for a national virtual collection. In Ridge, M. (ed.) Crowdsourcing our Cultural Heritage. Ashgate.

Conference papers

Presentations

  • Eccles, K. (2014) Crowdsourcing to understand public interactions with heritage. Presented at 'Sharing is Caring', Copenhagen, April 2014 (Keynote speaker).
  • Eccles, K. (2014) Crowdsourcing in the Arts and Humanities: Interdisciplinary approaches. Presented at 'Promoting Interdisciplinary Engagement in the Digital Humanities', University of Oxford, February 2014.
  • Eccles, K. (2013) Building a Museum without Walls: Using new technologies to understand public interactions with cultural heritage. Presented at the School of Creative Studies and Media Seminar, Bangor University (Invited speaker), December 2013.
  • Eccles, K. (2013) Tracking your Impact: the Toolkit for the Impact of Digitised Scholarly Resources. Presented at Engage Social Media Michaelmas, University of Oxford (Invited speaker), October 2013.
  • Eccles, K. (2013) Your Paintings Tagger: Public Tagging in a Virtual Museum. Presented at MuseumNext, Amsterdam, May 2013.
  • Eccles, K. (2013) What is crowdsourcing? How does it work? What can it offer academic research? Presented at the Multi-disciplinary Research Seminar Series, Bangor University (Invited speaker), April 2013.
  • Eccles, K. (2013) Digital Humanities at the Oxford Internet Institute. Presented to the Digital Media User Group, University of Oxford (Invited speaker), March 2013.
  • Eccles K. and Meyer, E.T. (2011) Thinking about Impact. Presented at Analysing Digital Audiences for the First World War Digital Content, JISC (Invited speaker), September 2011.
  • Eccles K. (2011) Using the Toolkit for the Impact of Digitised Scholarly Resources. Presented at Digital Impacts, Jesus College, University of Oxford, May 2011.
  • Eccles, K. (2010) Gendered Space in the University of Oxford, 1920-1939. Presented at the Social History Society Annual Conference, University of Glasgow, 30 March - 1 April 2010.
  • Eccles, K. (2010) Gendered Space in the University of Oxford, 1920-1939. Presented at the Social History Society Annual Conference, University of Glasgow, 30 March - 1 April 2010.
  • Schroeder, R., Meyer, E.T., and Eccles, K. (2009) Bottom-up, Top-Down, and other social and technological dynamics of e-Research. Talk presented at UK e-Science All Hands Meeting, Oxford, United Kingdom.
  • Eccles, K. and Meyer, E.T. (2009) What makes an online resource a well used resource? Users, impact and metrics. Talk at JISC Digital Content Conference 2009, Gloucestershire, UK, 30 June-1 July 2009.
  • Eccles, K. (2009) Butterflies or Bluestockings? Love, Leisure and Courtship in Inter-war Oxford. Gender and History Forum, University of Oxford, 2 June 2009.
  • Eccles, K. (2009) Historians' use of Digital Resources. Presented at 'Language of Politics' Conference, Durham University, 2-4 April 2009.
  • Eccles, K. (2009) Toolkit for the Impact of Digitised Scholarly Resources: Introduction to JISC Phase One Digitisation Projects. Presented at 'Humanities on the Web: Is it working?', Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, 19 March 2009.
  • Eccles, K. and Thelwall, M. (2009) Toolkit for the Impact of Digitised Scholarly Resources: Quantitative Methods. Presented at 'Humanities on the Web: Is it working?', Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, 19 March 2009.
  • Meyer, E. and Eccles, K. (2009) Toolkit for the Impact of Digitised Scholarly Resources: Qualitative Methods. Presented at 'Humanities on the Web: Is it working?', Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, 19 March 2009.
  • Eccles, K. (2009) Toolkits for e-Humanities. Presented at 'Humanities on the Web: Is it working?', Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, 19 March 2009.
  • Eccles, K. (2008) The Spectre of the Bluestocking in the lives of Educated Women in the early Twentieth Century. Bluestocking Journal Launch, Lincoln College, University of Oxford, December 2008.
  • Eccles, K. and Meyer, E.T. (2008) e-Research, the Oxford Internet Institute, and Gauging the Impact of Online Scholarly Resources. UKOLN Seminar Series, University of Bath, October 2008.
  • Eccles, K. (2006) Representations of undergraduate women at work and play in Oxford in the 1920s. Women's History Network Annual Conference, Durham University, September 2006.
  • Eccles, K. (2005) 'Little better than a girls' school'? The St Hugh's College 'Row' and the status of the Women's Colleges in Oxford in the 1920s. Modern British History Seminar, University of Oxford, November 2005.
  • Eccles, K. (2005) Borderlines and Gendered Space in World War One Oxford. North American Conference on British Studies (NACBS), Denver, October 2005.
  • Eccles, K. (2005) A very visual sign of difference: Oxford 'ndergraduettes' and the 'Hat and Gown of Charming Dignity'. Women's History Network Annual Conference, Southampton Solent University, September 2005.

Reports

Webcasts

  • The Impact of Digital Content (Roundtable Discussion)

    The Impact of Digital Content (Roundtable Discussion)

    Recorded on: 20 May 2011 Duration: 00:38:33

    A panel session to facilitate discussion about the future of digital content, the role that measuring impact will play, and how the value of digital content can be demonstrated.

  • Tools for Measuring the Impact of Digitised Resources

    Tools for Measuring the Impact of Digitised Resources

    Recorded on: 20 May 2011 Duration: 00:40:03

    Eric Meyer and Kathryn Eccles present the "Toolkit for the Impact of Digitised Scholarly Resources" and discuss methods for analysing online impact.

  • Toolkits for e-Humanities: Project Workshop

    Toolkits for e-Humanities: Project Workshop

    Recorded on: 19 March 2009 Duration: 01:11:16

    Presenting the results of the Digitised Resources: A Usage and Impact Study project, which combines quantitative and qualitative indicators to measure the impact of online scholarly resources.

News

Blog

  • The future of Digital Humanities

    Kathryn Eccles on 21 May 2014 09:56AM

    As Glen Worthy pointed out the week before last, there are a lot of terrible things written about the Digital Humanities.  As his commentary was published, I was attending a summit on the Future of the Digital Humanities organised by the Higher Education [...]

  • What will George Do?

    Kathryn Eccles on 20 Jan 2014 12:14PM

    I’m having so much fun working with colleagues at the Wales Centre for Behaviour Change at Bangor University, an interdisciplinary group with particular strengths in Psychology.  It’s making  me see the world in a completely different way, and [...]

  • Research with Impact

    Kathryn Eccles on 29 Jul 2013 10:54AM

    Academics spend an awful lot of time thinking about impact, what it means and how to make sure our work has sufficient of it, but it is a rare experience (for me at least) to be directly presented with the impact your work has had on someone else.  I was [...]

  • Do as I say, not as I do…

    Kathryn Eccles on 1 Jun 2013 15:51PM

    One of my resolutions when I started my AHRC fellowship was to blog more.  I’m a huge convert to Twitter, and now read lots of blogs that are linked to in tweets.  I’ve found myself learning so much more about those academics in my field who [...]