Professor Mark Graham

 Professor Mark Graham

Mark Graham's research focuses on Internet and information geographies, and the overlaps between ICTs and economic development.

Email: mark.graham@oii.ox.ac.uk

Tel: +44 (0)1865 287203

Profile

Mark Graham is an Associate Professor and Senior Research Fellow at the OII, a Research Fellow at Green Templeton College, and an Associate in the University of Oxford’s School of Geography and the Environment.

He has published articles in major geography, communications, and urban studies journals, and his work has been covered by the Economist, the BBC, the Washington Post, CNN, the Guardian, and many other newspapers and magazines. He is an editorial board member of Information, Communication, and Society, Geo:Geography, and the Environment, and Big Data and Society. He is also a member of DFID’s Digital Advisory Panel and the ESRC’s Peer Review College.

In 2014, he was awarded a European Research Council Starting Grant to lead a team to study 'knowledge economies' in Sub-Saharan Africa over five years. This will entail looking at both low-end (virtual labour and microwork) and high-end (innovation hubs and bespoke information services) in fifteen African cities.

The rest of his work can be divided into three categories:

ICT for Development

Mark is particularly interested in the multiplicity of attempts to implement development and reduce a 'digital divide' by altering economic positionalities and reconfiguring commodity chains in places on the global periphery. He is currently involved in a multi-year project funded by an ESRC-DFID grant to study the effects of broadband use and access in Kenya and Rwanda, asking who benefits (and who doesn’t) from improved connectivity. The ultimate aim of this research is to better understand the variety of strategies employed in using online-presence to offset remote physical presence. Mark’s previous work in this area focused on similar questions within the context of the Thai silk industry. These projects have been supported by the ESRC, the British Academy, the NSF, the Fell Fund, and the American Association of Geographers.

Internet and Information Geographies

Mark's work on the geographies of the Internet examines how people and places are ever more defined by, and made visible through, not only their traditional physical locations and properties, but also their virtual attributes and digital shadows. Specifically, he is interested in how ubiquitous electronic representations of urban environments that are made possible by services and platforms such as Google Maps, Twitter and Wikipedia (e.g. a project on Wikipedia's networks and geographies) have the power to redefine, reconfigure, and reorder the cities that they represent. Of particular interest are the barriers to participation and the way that some people can lack voice and representation in online platforms. This work has been featured in over one hundred media outlets around the world (including The Guardian, The New York Times, and Wired) and has been funded by the IDRC and the John Fell Fund. Some of his published academic work on this topic can be found on his website, while more recent work can be accessed on the Information Geography website, his zerogeography blog and the floatingsheep blog that he co-founded.

Economic Transparency

Novel ways of collaborating and pooling resources are being made possible by a new wave of Internet projects promoting transparency through commodity chains. The central element in these new projects is the ability of non-proximate transparency to effect patterns of consumption and economic flows. Mark's work in this area examines how a variety of social networks and the ability of consumers to monitor distant nodes on production chains can reorganise economic activities. His efforts centre on developing useful frameworks for the effects of non-proximate transparency, as well as detailed empirical studies on multiple transparency-promoting projects. He has recently set up a commodity chain tracing project (Wikichains.org) that will allow people to harness the power of user-generated content to uncover the hidden production practices, environmental effects, and economic geographies behind everyday items.

Research interests

Internet Geography, ICT for development, globalization, economic geography, transportation and communications, social theory, transparency, user-generated content, Southeast Asia, East Africa, zombies

Positions held at the OII

  • Senior Research Fellow and Associate Professor, May 2014 -
  • Senior Research Fellow, August 2013 - May 2014
  • Director of Research, October 2012 - December 2013
  • Research Fellow, October 2009 - July 2013

Research

Current projects

Past projects

Publications

Articles

Books

Chapters

  • Yasseri, T., Spoerri, A., Graham, M. and Kertész, J. (2014) The most controversial topics in Wikipedia: A multilingual and geographical analysis. In: P.Fichman and N.Hara (eds) Global Wikipedia: International and cross-cultural issues in online collaboration. Scarecrow Press.
  • Graham, M. and Haarstad, H. (2014) Open Development through Open Consumption: The Internet of Things, User-Generated Content and Economic Transparency. In M.L. Smith and K.M.A. Reilly (eds) Open Development: Networked Innovations in International Development. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Zook, M., Graham, M., and Boulton, A. (2014) Crowd-sourced Augmented Realities: Social Media and the Power of Digital Representation. In S.Mains, J.Cupples and C.Lukinbeal (eds) Mediated Geographies International Handbook. New York: Springer.
  • Graham, M. (2014) The Knowledge Based Economy and Digital Divisions of Labour. In V.Desai, and R.Potter (eds) Companion to Development Studies, 3rd edn. Hodder, pp. 189-195.
  • Allagui, I., Graham, M., and Hogan, B. (2014) Wikipedia Arabe et la Construction Collective du Savoir. In L.Barbe and L. Merzeau (eds) Wikipedia, objet scientifique non identifie. Paris: Presses Universitaries du Paris Ouest.
  • Graham, M. (2013) Virtual Geographies and Urban Environments: Big data and the ephemeral, augmented city. In M. Acuto and W. Steele (eds) Global City Challenges: debating a concept, improving the practice. London: Palgrave.
  • Graham, M. (2013) The Virtual Dimension. In M.Acuto and W.Steele (eds) Global City Challenges: debating a concept, improving the practice. London: Palgrave, pp. 117-139.
  • Graham, M., Shelton, T., and M. Zook (2013) Mapping Zombies: A Guide for Pre-Apocalptic Analysis and Post-Apocalyptic Survival. In A.Whelan, R.Walker and C.Moore (eds) Zombies in the Academy: Living Death in Higher Education. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, pp. 147-156.
  • Graham, M. (2012) The Knowledge Based Economy and Digital Divisions of Labour. In V.Desai and R.Potter (eds) Companion to Development Studies, 3rd edn. Hodder.
  • Brunn, S., Ghose, R. and Graham, M. (2012) Cities of the Future and the Future of Cities. In S.Brunn, M.Hays-Mitchell and D.Ziegler (eds) Cities of the World, 5th edn. Rowman and Littlefield, pp. 557-597.
  • Graham, M. (2012) The Knowledge Based Economy and Digital Divisions of Labour. In V. Desai, and R. Potter (eds) Companion to Development Studies, 3rd edn. Hodder.
  • Graham, M. (2012) Die Welt in Der Wikipedia Als Politik der Exklusion: Palimpseste des Ortes und selective Darstellung. In S. Lampe, and P. Bäumer (eds) Wikipedia. Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung/bpb, Bonn.
  • Graham, M. (2011) Wiki Space: Palimpsests and the Politics of Exclusion. In: G.Lovink and N.Tkacz (eds) Critical Point of View: A Wikipedia Reader. Amsterdam: Institute of Network Cultures.
  • Graham, M. and Haarstad, H. (2011) Global Production Patterns. In: J.Stoltman (ed.) 21st Century Geography: A Reference Handbook. London: Sage, pp. 411-421.
  • Graham, M. (2011) Cultural Brokers, the Internet, and Value Chains. In: F.Wherry and N.Bandelj (eds) The Cultural Wealth of Nations. Stanford: Stanford University Press, pp. 222-239.
  • Graham, M. (2011) Cloud Collaboration: Peer-Production and the Engineering of the Internet. In S.Brunn (ed.) Engineering Earth. New York: Springer, pp. 67-83.
  • Graham, M. (2010) Disintermediation as Development in the Thai Silk Industry: the Internet and Reconfigured Commodity Chains. In: F.Wherry and N.Bandelj (eds) The Cultural Wealth of Nations.
  • Graham, M. (2010) Engineering Earth 2.0: Neogeography and Virtual Earths. In: S.Brunn (ed.) Engineering Earth. New York: Kluwer.
  • Zook, M., Graham, M. and Shelton, T. (2010) The Presidential Placemark Poll. In: S.Brunn (ed.) Atlas of the 2008 Election.
  • Brunn, S., Ghose, R. and Graham, M. (2008) Cities of the Future and the Future of Cities. In: S.Brunn, M.Hays-Mitchell and D.Ziegler (eds) Cities of the World [4th edn]. Rowman and Littlefield, pp. 565-613.
  • Zook, M. and Graham, M. (2007) From Cyberspace to DigiPlace: Visibility in an Age of Information and Mobility. In: H.J.Miller (ed.) Societies and Cities in the Age of Instant Access. Springer, pp. 231-244.
  • Zook, M. and Graham, M. (2006) Wal-Mart Nation: Mapping the Reach of a Retail Colossus. In: S.Brunn (ed.) Wal-Mart World. Routledge, pp. 15-25.

Conference papers

  • Zook, M., Graham, M. and Shelton, T. (2011) Analyzing global cyberscapes: mapping geo-coded internet information. Proceedings of the 2011 iConference.
  • Meyer, E.T., Graham, M., and Schroeder, R. (2010) Online visibility, local practices, and access to global knowledge. Paper presented at the XVII International Sociological Association World Congress of Sociology, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Reports

Teaching

Courses taught at the OII

  • ICT and Development

    Introducing the debates and practices surrounding ICT uses in the Global South and Global North, drawing on Anthropology, Development Studies, Economics, Geography and History to examine the theoretical and conceptual frameworks that underpin development.

DPhil students supervised at the OII

Current students

Webcasts

  • Four Thought

    Four Thought

    Recorded on: 18 May 2014 Duration: 00:15:30

    Are the information-rich just getting richer? Listen to Mark Graham discuss the ecology of unevenness on the Internet.

  • Internet and Information Geographies: Mark Graham at TEDxBradford

    Internet and Information Geographies: Mark Graham at TEDxBradford

    Recorded on: 5 November 2012 Duration: 00:22:34

    Mark Graham examines how people and places are ever more defined by, and made visible through, not only their traditional physical locations and properties, but also their virtual attributes and digital shadows.

  • The Potential of the Internet for Development: Digital Divides and Uneven Geographies of Knowledge

    The Potential of the Internet for Development: Digital Divides and Uneven Geographies of Knowledge

    Recorded on: 13 April 2012 Duration: 00:40:07

    The Internet has put information at the centre of the global economy. It is therefore important to understand who produces and reproduces this information, who has access, and who and where is represented in our contemporary knowledge economy.

News

  • Society and the Internet: New book edited by Mark Graham and William H. Dutton

    29 May 2014 Oxford Internet Institute

    How is society being shaped by the diffusion and increasing centrality of the Internet in everyday life and work? This volume introduces students to a core set of readings that address this question in specific social and institutional contexts.

  • Infographic: A freelance working week revealed

    14 May 2014 Wired.co.uk

    The patterns of work of the world's freelancers has been mapped by an OII team led by Mark Graham and Stefano de Sabbata as part of a research project on virtual labour.

  • Does Kenya's National Broadband Strategy Position it for Second-World Status?

    28 April 2014 Government Technology

    The technology site reports on broadband in Kenya quoting Mark Graham extensively. Unbridled optimist about new technology in Kenya is both good and bad he says.

  • Infographic: A freelance working week revealed

    24 April 2014 Wired.co.uk

    Wired.co.uk reports on Mark Graham’s work on mapping patterns of work as part of a project on virtual labour. He will be visiting eight countries in Asia and Africa over two years to carry out the essential field work.

  • Talk about a series of tubes: Undersea Internet cables mapped like the London Underground

    4 April 2014 Washington Post

    The 'Switch' blog of the Washington post discusses the graphic visualisation of the submarine fibre-optic cable network using the London tube map as a template.

  • London Underground map depicts Internet's backbone

    3 April 2014 ITV

    London Underground's iconic map design has been used by researchers at Oxford University to explain the Internet's complex network of submarine fiber optic cables.

  • The Tube-Style Map Of The Internet's Backbone

    2 April 2014 Sky News

    The fibre-optic cables that criss-cross the globe have been visualised by the OII's Stefano De Sabbata and Mark Graham.

  • Interactive: which countries have the most Google search results?

    18 March 2014 The Guardian

    Does the number of pages returned by Google tie up closely with the size of a country's population? The OII's work on Internet geographies is featured.

  • Internet : à quel point votre pays est-il connu sur Google?

    14 March 2014 Jeune Afrique

    Coverage of OII work on the geographies of information.

  • Why the wealthiest countries are also the most open with their data

    14 March 2014 Washington Post

    Coverage of an OII visualization of the state of open data in 70 countries around the world, showing a prominent global "openness divide".

  • There Are More Wikipedia Articles About This One Small Part of the World Than the Rest of It Combined

    25 February 2014 The Atlantic

    Analysis by Mark Graham and colleagues of over 3 million Wikipedia articles in the 44 most popular languages reveals that the majority of references are about an area occupying only 2.5 percent of the world's land mass.

  • Die Kolonialmächte des Internets

    8 November 2013 Die Zeit Data Blog

    The colonial power of the Internets. Die Zeit features maps of internet users and domain owners created by OII researchers. (German)

  • The US, Germany, and Britain still dominate the Internet

    6 November 2013 Washington Post

    Wonkblog, part of the Washington Post featured the maps created by Mark Graham, Stefano De Sabbato and Matthew Zook which demonstrate the geography of top-level domain names.

  • Why You Won't Find Tuvalu on a Map of the World's Internet Domains

    6 November 2013 Slate

    Slate magazine looks at the methods behind the maps of the world internet domains, created by Stefano de Sabbata, Mark Graham and Matthew Zook.

  • Um império chamado Google

    30 October 2013 Epoca

    An Empire called Google: Brazilian magazine Epoca features a map by the OII's Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata depicting the world's "Internet empires" highlighting the most popular website in each country.

  • Interactive map: African countries sized by number of Wikipedia articles

    28 October 2013 Guardian Data Store

    Is a country's presence online based on its population size and access to the internet? OII Researchers mapped how much was written about each African country on the online reference site Wikipedia.

  • Here's Where The 6 Billion Photos On Flickr Come From

    12 October 2013 Business Insider

    The Australian site features the map by Mark Graham et al which uses Flickr to demonstrate which parts of the world are visually most represent online.

  • 42% of the world’s Internet users live in Asia

    11 October 2013 Yahoo Finance Singapore

    Singapore’s financial news uses OII maps on internet use in Asia to illustrate the point that Asia is the world’s biggest continent and also the world’s biggest internet market.

  • World's online population mapped

    11 October 2013 Stuff.co.nz

    The New Zealand technology site highlights the findings of the Information Geographies project map of the world's online population.

  • Awesome map shows every country's favourite website

    7 October 2013 Herald Sun

    Work by the OII's Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata depicts the world's "Internet empires" in a map highlighting the most popular website in each country.

  • Die meistbesuchten Webseiten der Welt

    7 October 2013 De Bild

    Work by the OII's Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata depicts the world's "Internet empires" in a map highlighting the most popular website in each country.

  • 'Age of Internet Empires' toont de populairste websites wereldwijd

    6 October 2013 De Morgen

    Work by the OII's Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata depicts the world's "Internet empires" in a map highlighting the most popular website in each country.

  • Google most popular site globally: Report

    6 October 2013 Times of India

    Tech News in Times of India reports on the map created by Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata which reveals the most popular websites across the world.

  • Google dominates around the world

    5 October 2013 Television New Zealand

    Google is the most popular website used in New Zealand and around the world, with over one billion people visiting it, according to new research conducted by the OII's Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata.

  • Google, Facebook rule Age of Internet Empires

    5 October 2013 India Today

    Work by the OII's Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata depicts the world's "Internet empires" in a map highlighting the most popular website in each country.

  • Age of Internet Empires: One Map With Each Country's Favorite Website

    4 October 2013 The Atlantic

    Work by the OII's Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata depicts the world's "Internet empires" in a map highlighting the most popular website in each country.

  • Age of Internet Empires: One Map With Each Country's Favorite Website

    4 October 2013 The Atlantic

    Stefano De Sabbata and Dr Mark Graham have created a map which shows the most popular website in each country, using a design that pays homage to the Age of Empires video game series.

  • Cuáles son los sitios web más populares del mundo en cada país

    4 October 2013 La Nacion

    Work by the OII's Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata depicts the world's "Internet empires" in a map highlighting the most popular website in each country.

  • Google rules the West but Japan still prefers Yahoo: Map reveals how different internet giants dominate countries across the globe

    4 October 2013 Daily Mail

    Work by the OII's Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata depicts the world's "Internet empires" in a map highlighting the most popular website in each country.

  • Google rules the West but Japan still prefers Yahoo: Map reveals how different internet giants dominate countries across the globe Read more: Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

    4 October 2013 Daily Mail

    A map of most visited websites across the world created by OII researchers show that Google dominates in the west followed by Facebook.

  • Google vs. Facebook vs. Baidu: Battle of the Internet empires

    4 October 2013 ZDNet

    Work by the OII's Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata depicts the world's "Internet empires" in a map highlighting the most popular website in each country.

  • Google Vs. Facebook: A Map Of Global Conquest

    4 October 2013 NPR

    NPR take a look at the OII maps of global internet use.

  • And The World's Most Popular Websites Are...

    3 October 2013 CBC News

    Work by the OII's Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata depicts the world's "Internet empires" in a map highlighting the most popular website in each country.

  • Facebook or Google: which website rules the world?

    3 October 2013 The Guardian

    Work by the OII's Mark Graham and Stefano De Sabbata depicts the world's "Internet empires" in a map highlighting the most popular website in each country.

  • Facebook or Google: which website rules the world?

    3 October 2013 Guardian Online

    Stefano De Sabbata and Dr Mark Graham from the Oxford Internet Institute have created a map which shows the most popular website in each country, using a design that pays homage to the Age of Empires video game series.

  • Microsoft beams Internet into Africa – using TV ‘white spaces’

    23 September 2013 CNN News

    Mark Graham welcomes an initiative to bring broadband to rural African communities using the unused channels of broadcast TV spectrum but expresses a note of caution,  saying schools in Africa may have other, equal needs.

  • Kenya’s laptops for schools dream fails to address reality

    27 June 2013 The Guardian Poverty Matters Blog

    The Kenyan Government is investing a massive £400 million in 1.3 million laptops for school children. Mark Graham argues that this strategy ignores the realities of a country of great inequalities and the funding might be better directed elsewhere.

  • Chile, el tema más controvertido de Wikipedia en espaňol

    3 June 2013 BBC Mundo

    The most controversial topics in Spanish Wikipedia, identified by Taha Yasseri and Mark Graham are highlighted on the BBC’s Spanish language web site.

  • Wikipedia 'Edit Wars': The most hotly contested topics

    3 June 2013 NBC News online

    Taha Yasseri says Wikipedia suffers from traditional features of human societies. People argue most on Wikipedia about religion and politics with variations on non-English language sites. Romanians for example argue most about musicians and art.

  • Wikipedians most likely to war over 'Israel,' 'God'

    3 June 2013 The Times of Israel

    Reporting Taha Yasseri’s work the Times of Israel notes that in Hebrew Wikipedia  the greatest divisions are mainly about religious sects and armed conflicts but across the languages ‘Israel ‘ and ‘Hitler’ are the most contested subjects.

  • The Most Controversial Article in all of English Wikipedia is George Bush’s

    31 May 2013 The Huffington Post

    The Huffington Post says that the study of controversial topics in Wikipedia by Taha Yasseri and Mark Graham contains some ‘incredible graphics’ several of which are displayed.

  • Wikipedia 'Edit Wars': The most hotly contested topics

    31 May 2013 Live Science

    Taha Yasseri says Wikipedia suffers from traditional features of human societies. People argue most on Wikipedia about religion and politics with variations on non-English language sites. Romanians for example argue most about musicians and art.

  • The Controversial Topics of Wikipedia

    30 May 2013 Wired Science Blog

    Wired magazine article sets out some of the findings of Taha Yasseri, mark Graham and colleagues’ work on contested subjects in Wikipedia.  The table of the most controversial articles in each language edition is featured.

  • Every Wikipedia flame war in 1 impressive map

    29 May 2013 The Daily Dot

    Online community newspaper The Daily Dot features the Wikipedia Conflict Map created by Taha Yasseri, Mark Graham and others which highlights areas of controversy among Wikipedia contributors and editors.

  • Wikipedia: Über Israel und Hitler streitet man überall

    28 May 2013 Zeit Online

    On Wikipedia people everywhere argue about Israel as well as Hitler. Die Zeit blog explores the discussions of contentious issues on Wikipedia drawing heavily on the research of Taha Yasseri and Mark Graham.

  • Wikipedia is not free

    21 May 2013 Caijing.com.cn

    The challenge for Wikipedia of expanding beyond the English speaking world is published in the independent Beijing-based Chinese language magazine. Mark Graham’s research is referenced and DPhil student Heath Ford is quoted.

  • OPINIÓN: El acceso generalizado a internet, ¿es una meta alcanzable?

    17 May 2013 CNN Mexico

    Is widespread access to the Internet and achievable goal? Mark Graham’s work is referenced in the Spanish language site, noting the US, Canada and Europe account for 84 per cent of the articles in Wikipedia.

  • Gütesiegel für Wikipedia

    13 May 2013 Technology Review

    The German Technology site looks at how academics use Wikipedia in Germany and beyond. It refers to Mark Graham’s work, quoted in ‘The Atlantic’, suggesting that Wikipedia reflects the background of its editors and contributors.

  • Why Wikipedia’s Millionth Russian Page Is Worth Celebrating

    11 May 2013 Simulacrum

    An English language version of an article originally in Russian links to Mark Graham’s work on the origins of Wikipedia articles and notes that diasporas have an important role to play.

  • Malaysia's social media election

    2 May 2013 Al Jazeera

    In the run-up to the Malaysia's first 'social media' election, Al Jazeera quotes findings by Mark Graham that Malaysia is the sixth largest producer of information via Twitter in the world.

  • Catalan Wikipedia Reaches 400,000 Article Milestone

    19 April 2013 Global Voices

    The Catalan version of Wikipedia plays an important role in raising global awareness of the region, people and its language.  Mark Graham says that nowhere in the world has such high visibility for a language is relatively little spoken.

  • Free for all? Lifting the lid on a Wikipedia crisis

    17 April 2013 New Scientist

    In an in-depth analysis of the challenges facing Wikipedia in expanding participation beyond the English speaking world, Mark Graham’s research on Wikipedia is referenced and DPhil student Heather Ford is quoted.

  • Where is Africa on the Internet?

    1 April 2013 WIPO

    The UN Agency website quotes Mark Graham's research findings in an article about the WikiAfrica project. He says that there are more Wikipedia articles written about Antarctica than all but one of the 54 countries of Africa.

  • Who Writes the Wikipedia Entries About Where You Live?

    26 March 2013 The Atlantic

    Mark Graham tackles the issue of where our information comes from, and how this should influence the way we interpret it?

  • Where is Africa on the Internet?

    18 March 2013 WIPO

    The UN Agency website quotes Mark Graham's research findings in an article about the WikiAfrica project. He says that there are more Wikipedia articles written about Antarctica than all but one of the 54 countries of Africa.

  • Sad if no ethics in social media

    28 February 2013 Straits Times

    In a speech at an event during Malaysia's Social Media Week, PM Datuk Seri Naji Razak referred to Mark Graham's work on Twitter usage as evidence that Malaysia stands out as a forward looking country.

  • Najib: Election 2013 first social media election

    27 February 2013 The Malaysian Insider

    The Malaysian Prime Minister has predicted that the forthcoming election will be Malaysia's first social media election.  He quoted research by Mark Graham which indicated that Malaysia and Brazil have very high levels of Twitter use.

  • Tweets help visualise information density of African cities

    18 February 2013 DW Akademie

    'Cities have become both digital and digitized' says Mark Graham whose work on geocoded tweets in African cities is answering questions on his research for Deutsche Welle Akademie.

  • Mapping Tweets in Africa

    14 February 2013 The Guardian Data Store

    Who uses Twitter in Africa? Where are they based?  The Guardian Data Store says that Mark Graham’s datamaps of tweets from key African cities provide a unique insight.

  • The Urbanist: A weekly look at the people and ideas shaping our urban lives. Maps.

    14 February 2013 Monocle

    Monocle's editor Andrew Tuck interviews Mark Graham about maps. Episode 70 (14 February)

  • How the Internet Reinforces Inequality in the Real World

    6 February 2013 The Atlantic

    In this in-depth article, Mark Graham discusses the different ways we can think about and study the digital information about real-world places in the geoweb.

  • Big data and the death of the theorist

    25 January 2013 Wired

    Mark Graham is skeptical about on the death of the scientific theory at the hands of big data analysis: "when talking about 'big data' and the humanities, there will always be things that are left unsaid, things that haven't been measured or codified".

  • Uncharted territory: Where digital maps are leading us

    25 January 2013 New Scientist

    The problem with many digital maps is that it is difficult to know how they have been curated - and who, what and where is left out. And the map-making choices made by the likes of Google or Microsoft are often unclear, says Mark Graham.

  • Tweets decide SAFC v Toon fans’ debate

    12 January 2013 Jarrow and Hebburn Gazette

    Regional newspaper, the Jarrow and Hebburn Gazette highlights the references to the football clubs of the North East in the Premier League Twitter map created by the OII team.

  • Chasing data shadows: Twitter map of football fans

    11 January 2013 University of Oxford

    A team from the OII has created an interactive Twitter map to find out where conversations about premier league football clubs originate.  It shows that there are fewer Manchester United fans in London and the south-east than is popularly assumed.

  • Most Man U fans do not come from the south, study shows

    11 January 2013 ITV

    ITV reports the work of the OII team on the interactive Premier League Twitter map.

  • Now a Twitter map of football fans

    11 January 2013 India Blooms

    India based web-site reports the work of the OII team on the interactive Premier League Twitter map.

  • Oxford Internet Institute maps Premier League Twitter conversations in UK

    11 January 2013 Anchorfan

    Social Sport News site reports on the interactive map produced by Mark Graham and the OII team which maps twitter conversations about Premier League football clubs.

  • Twitter map finally reveals exactly where Manchester United fans live

    11 January 2013 Daily Telegraph

    The Daily Telegraph highlights the ‘fascinating’ map plotting Twitter conversations about Premier League Football clubs created by a team at the OII.

  • Which Premier League teams are the most popular in search area? A Twitter interactive map

    11 January 2013 The Guardian

    The interactive map of geotagged Tweets mentioning Premier League teams or associated hashtags  created by the team at the OII features on the Data Store Show and Tell page of the Guardian.

  • Digital trails of the UK floods - how well do tweets match observations?

    28 November 2012 The Guardian, Datablog

    Physical phenomena like floods don’t just leave physical trails; they create digital ones as well. Mark Graham and the team have combined meteorological and social media data to plot data shadows of the recent UK floods.

  • Election 2012: Twitter map predicts presidential race results

    6 November 2012 Syracuse.com

    A map of the origins of tweets referencing either Obama or Romney in the month leading up to the US presidential elections predicted the outcome. 

  • Twitter Map Predicts 2012 Presidential Election: Will It Be Right?

    6 November 2012 Huffington Post Technology (US)

    A map of the origins of tweets referencing either Obama or Romney in the month leading up to the US presidential elections predicted the outcome. 

  • Double Take

    4 November 2012 BBC Radio 5 Live

    Mark Graham talks to Radio 5 Live about the role of social media in spreading information during a crisis.

  • What can Twitter tell us about Hurricane Sandy flooding? Visualised

    31 October 2012 Guardian Datablog

    Mark Graham, with help from an OII team, collected tweets mentioning flooding to examine how twitter usage might reflect lived experiences of Hurricane Sandy. The resulting visualisation shows where US tweets originated over the crucial two days.

  • The new local

    27 October 2012 The Economist

    The physical and the digital world are becoming increasingly intertwined.  The smartphone allows easy online exploration of physical surroundings.  A paper by Mark Graham and others which imagines a digital 'Ulysses' through Dublin is quoted.

  • The world in your pocket

    27 October 2012 The Economist

    Mark Graham's work on the geoweb, online information used by digital mapmakers,  is highlighted in an article about how digital maps are created. The geoweb is thickest in the Nordic countries and thinnest in the poorest areas.

  • Siamo tutti cartografi

    1 October 2012 Corriere della sera

    Mark Graham is quoted in an article about geomapping, explaining how digital maps are created and the discrepancies between the richest and poorest countries.

  • In the Balance: Are we all smartphone users now?

    16 September 2012 BBC World Service

    Mark Graham and others discussed whether increased connectivity changes lives and if business people must have smartphones. The panel agreed that connectivity does change lives but was less convinced about smartphones, especially in Africa.

  • Geography, Big Data, and Augmented Realities

    1 August 2012 Oxford Internet Institute

    New digital dimensions of place profoundly affect the ways that we interact with our urban environments. Dr Mark Graham leads a research project to interrogate these virtual layers of the city, asking what they are, where they are, and why they matter.

  • London 2012 Olympics: the first Twitter Games opens debate of athletes using social media

    31 July 2012 Daily Telegraph

    Olympic athletes have been interacting with sports fans and the general public via social media and in particular Twitter. But there is divided opinion among athletes and coaches as to the benefits. Mark Graham comments.

  • Map of the Day: The Geography of Klout

    17 July 2012 The Atlantic

    Coverage of an OII map of the geography of Klout, the online service that attempts to gauge social media influence. The map was produced as part of OII research on the geography of Twitter.

  • US tops Twitter Chart

    6 July 2012 CorpComms

    The on-line magazine for corporate communicators reports the research by Mark Graham and Monica Stephens into the origin of Twitter users. Mark's comments on the OII website about the usefulness of Twitter are quoted.

  • Where Tweets are born: the top countries on Twitter

    6 July 2012 Huffington Post (USA)

    Mark Graham’s research into the countries that use Twitter most shows that citizens in the US use Twitter more than any other country, followed by Brazil, Indonesia and the UK.

  • Tweeting all over the world

    5 July 2012 Daily Mail

    The Daily Mail reports details of OII research into the origin of tweets. Mark Graham is extensively quoted on how he and fellow researcher Monica Stephens went about collecting data and mapping the results.

  • Where the World's Tweets Come From, Vizualised.

    5 July 2012 Gizmodo

    Report of the research by Mark Graham and Monica Stephens into the origins of Tweets worldwide.

  • Church vs beer: using Twitter to map regional differences in US culture

    4 July 2012 Guardian Data-Store

    The Guardian Data Store featured one of Mark Graham's visualisations which used geolocated Tweets to gauge differences in culture across the US. The most tweets including 'beer' came from San Francisco and the most for 'church' from Dallas, Texas.

  • Where Do the World's Tweets Come From?

    29 June 2012 The Atlantic.com

    The OII visualization 'A Geography of Twitter' is a good illustration of how wide is the Twitter world says Rebecca Rosen. Authors Mark Graham and Monica Stephens suggest Twitter might allow democratization of information sharing and production.

  • OII Recognised as Educational Institution of the Year at Wikimedia UK's Annual Conference

    15 June 2012 Oxford Internet Institute

    The OII has been recognised as Educational Institution of the Year at the "UK Wikimedian of the Year" awards (12 May 2012). The award was made largely in recognition of the work by OII Research Fellow Dr Mark Graham to map and visualise Wikipedia data.

  • Wikipedia busts the language barrier

    16 May 2012 New Scientist

    Mark Graham comments on Omnipedia, a software system which allows users to browse topics from up to 25 Wikipedia language editions at once.

  • The Problem with Wikidata

    6 April 2012 The Atlantic

    Mark Graham highlights potential drawbacks to Wikidata, an initiative by Wikipedia which will allow a single change on a central repository to change references across all the language versions. The risk is that cultural context will be lost.

  • Wikipedia world: an interactive guide to every language. Infographic map

    4 April 2012 The Guardian

    In 'Show and Tell' on the Guardian Data Store, Simon Rogers, winner of the OII award for best internet journalist in 2011, highlights the Mapping Wikipedia project which shows millions of articles worldwide in a variety of languages.

  • O mundo pela Wikipédia

    1 April 2012 Exame Magazine

    Exame, the Brazilian economic and business magazine, features the work of Mark Graham and colleagues on Wikipedia as part of the Geographies of the World's Knowledge project.

  • Confirmed: The Internet Does Not Solve Global Inequality

    26 March 2012 The Atlantic

    The message of the OII's interactive iBook "Geographies of the World's Knowledge" confirms that the Anglophone world dominates academic and user-generating publishing and rich countries dominate the production of user content.

  • Big data and the end of theory?

    9 March 2012 The Guardian

    The notion that 'big' data produces better insights and results than traditional methodology has gained traction in popular imagination and beyond. But does big data have the answers that specialists can't provide? Mark Graham suggests otherwise.

  • Without Wikipedia, where can you get your facts?

    18 January 2012 BBC News

    On the day that Wikipedia blacks out its English language site, the BBC News magazine explores alternative sources of information. Mark Graham says that Wikipedia is open access, free and that mistakes are quickly corrected.

  • In a networked world, why is the geography of knowledge still uneven?

    9 January 2012 The Guardian

    User-generated Internet content is weighted towards the global north; Mark Graham suggests that the division of digital labour urgently needs rebalancing.

  • Santa v Satan v Zombies: who wins in the battle for Google Maps?

    16 December 2011 The Guardian Datablog

    Father Christmas faces the Devil and the undead in this academic research from Mark Graham’s work on Google maps

  • Wikipedia Language Maps Created By Oxford Internet Institute's Mark Graham

    13 November 2011 Huffington Post

    "Mark Graham led a team of researchers who broke down Wikipedia's geotagged articles by language and examined the global scope of the encyclopedia. They plotted these data onto maps of the world to show the spread of languages within the encyclopedia."

  • The world of Wikipedia's languages mapped

    11 November 2011 Guardian Datablog

    What happens if you map every geotagged Wikipedia article - and then analyse it for language use? A team of Oxford University researchers has found out.

  • This Map Shows the World of Wikipedia Broken Down by Languages

    11 November 2011 Gizmodo US

    "Ever wondered if anyone outside your redneck little town writes about it on Wikipedia? Or if anyone has ever written about Australia in Arabic? Guess no longer, because someone's worked it out for you."

  • Fibre-optic hopes for East Africa

    31 October 2011 Economic and Social Research Council

    Mark Graham interviewed on East African broadband: "The arrival of fibre-optic cables has been generally perceived as a hugely transformative event. There seems to be a lot of optimism that East African businesses will now be able to compete globally".

  • Oxford Internet Institute creates zombie awareness map: Zombie-related internet activity surveyed across the world

    8 October 2011 Cherwell

    Cherwell features the OII's zombie awareness map, part of the OII visualisation series. Mark Graham comments "Broadly speaking I am interested in the geography of information. I'm also a big fan of (or terrified of) zombies".

  • Oxford on standby for zombie invasion

    7 October 2011 The Oxford Student

    "Computer wizards at the Oxford Internet Institute (OII) have constructed an online map which denotes the part of the world where the search keyword "zombie" is most prevalent." The map is part of the OII's visualisation series.

  • The Flickr map of the world

    30 September 2011 The Guardian

    Who shares their images with the world? The Guardian's Datablog highlights Mark Graham's visualisation of Flickr use worldwide.

  • Oxford University on zombie alert

    29 September 2011 Technolog, msnbc.com

    "So you know the impending zombie apocalypse, the one we in the Western world await with a mix of dread and anticipation?" Mark Graham maps the zombie apocalypse using the Google Maps database.

  • The World Map of the Places That Care About Zombies

    23 September 2011 The Atlantic Wire

    "The Oxford Internet Institute produces some of the more engaging data-visualizations we seem to come across on Tumblr or Twitter". Mark Graham maps the zombie apocalypse using the Google Maps database.

  • The Zombie Map of the World

    23 September 2011 The Guardian

    "What happens when you ask Google maps for the location of zombies around the world?" Mark Graham maps the zombie apocalypse using the Google Maps database.

  • Getting creative with data

    15 August 2011 The Guardian

    Mark Graham is quoted on the power of new technology to assist sustainability and ethical consumption.

  • Oxford: East African SMEs Clamoring to Use Internet

    7 July 2011 GBI Portal

    The ESRC and DFID have awarded funding to the East Africa research group at the Oxford Internet Institute (OII), led by Dr Mark Graham, to study the economic impact of broadband roll-out in East Africa.

  • A New Kind of Globalisation? User-Generated Content and Transparent Production Chains

    9 December 2010 The Guardian

    Mark Graham writes about visualising production chains: in an age of transparency and instant access to information, why do we know so little about the factories and farms that make the things that we consume?

  • Will broadband internet establish a new development trajectory for east Africa?

    7 October 2010 The Guardian

    Mark Graham on how recent investment in broadband in East Africa (the last major region on Earth without fibre-optic broadband Internet connections) will fundamentally alter the connectivity of the region.

  • "Football" crazy

    19 June 2010 The Economist

    Discussing Mark Graham's work that calculates the proportion of all geo-tagged internet content (linked to Google Map placemarks) mentioning the word "football" in the 32 countries competing in the 2010 World Cup.

  • Which nation talks about football the most in cyberspace?

    17 June 2010 University of Oxford

    Mark Graham uses Google Maps to determine whether the term 'football' or 'soccer' is preferred across the world and which nations like to talk about football the most.

  • The Beer Belly of America

    17 March 2010 New York Times

    Mark Graham uses Google Maps data to shows the parts of the US where bars outnumber grocery stores, in order to chart drinking patterns and visualize how social values help shape economic markets.

  • The playcast: Decoding Wikipedia and following cricket on Twitter

    21 January 2010 Mint.com

    Interview with Mark Graham about the geography of Wikipedia, looking at those places in the world that are well-represented in in wikipedia, and those which aren't.

  • Map Reveals Which Countries Wikipedia Discusses Most -- And Least

    12 December 2009 Huffington Post

    Mark Graham's Wikipedia map shows areas best covered by Wikipedia: 'Remarkably there are more Wikipedia articles written about Antarctica than all but one of the fifty-three countries in Africa.'

  • Wikipedia's known unknowns

    1 December 2009 The Guardian

    Marks Graham's analysis of Wikipedia entries reveals the world's knowledge deserts - which may provide a second wave of activity for the online encyclopedia.

Blog