See our past projects

  • Creative Algorithmic Intelligence: Capabilities and Complementarity

    Participants: Professor Michael Osborne, Professor Rebecca Eynon, Anne Ploin, Dr Paul Duckworth

    This project seeks to map present and future interfaces between human and artificial creative intelligence, and investigate the ways in which creative human/AI collaboration may contribute to human flourishing.

  • Discriminatory Effects of Automated Decision Making in Information Controls

    Participants: Dr Joss Wright

    This project seeks to determine how the factors that drive internet filtering can negatively affect vulnerable groups in society.

  • Oxford Martin Programme on the Illegal Wildlife Trade

    Participants: Dr Joss Wright

    This project will develop an international hub to track and analyse the global illegal wildlife trade, both online and offline, and develop strategies to reduce the threat of the trade through social policy interventions.

  • Explaining black-box decisions

    Participants: Professor Sandra Wachter, Dr Brent Mittelstadt, Dr Chris Russell

    This project transforms the concept of counterfactual explanations into a practically useful tool for explaining automated black-box decisions.

  • Alternative News Networks – Understanding the spread and influence of disinformation, propaganda, and divisive political news content in the UK online information ecosystem

    Participants: Dr Jonathan Bright, Professor Philip Howard, Dr Scott Hale, Hannah Bailey, Mona Elswah, Megha Mishra, Dr Vidya Narayanan, Marcel Schliebs, Christian Schwieter, Katarina Rebello, Ali Arsalan Pasha Siddiqui, Karolina Werens

    This project seeks to understand the health of the UK online information ecosystem, including tracking the spread of divisive and misleading content.

  • OxIS: Oxford Internet Surveys

    Participants: Grant Blank

    Research on access, use and attitudes to the Internet in Britain based on biennial surveys covering (for example) digital and social inclusion and exclusion, mobile use, social media, safety and privacy concerns, Internet regulation, and behaviour.

  • Data Work: Collaboration, Sense Making and the Possible Futures for Work

    Participants: Professor Gina Neff

    How do new types of data change workplace practices?

  • Decolonizing the Internet’s Languages

    Participants: Dr Martin Dittus

    This project evaluates the state of the world’s languages online, seeking to determine which global languages are currently underserved by popular online platforms.

  • iLabour: The Construction of Labour Markets, Institutions and Movements on the Internet

    Participants: Professor Vili Lehdonvirta, Dr Otto Kässi, Greetje (Gretta) Corporaal, Dr Alex J. Wood

    The iLabour project is premised on the idea that a fundamental change is taking place in labour markets. It seeks to understand the social and policy implications of this momentous shift.

  • A Fairwork Foundation: Towards fair work in the platform economy

    Participants: Professor Mark Graham, Dr Jamie Woodcock, Adam Badger

    The Fairwork Foundation will certify online labour platforms, using leverage from workers, consumers, and platforms to improve the welfare and job quality of digital workers.

  • OxDEG: The Oxford Digital Ethnography Group

    Participants: Professor Eric T. Meyer, Dr Heather Ford, John McManus, Shireen Walton, Dr William Kelly

    OxDEG, the Oxford Digital Ethnography Group, comprises students and faculty members from Oxford University who discuss and share ideas about the evolution of ethnography in a heavily mediated world.

  • Turing Institute

    Participants:

    We are a contributing department to the Alan Turing Institute (ATI), which will place the UK at the forefront of world-wide research in data science.

  • WIP: World Internet Project

    Participants: Dr Grant Blank

    The World Internet Project (WIP) carries out panel surveys in over twenty countries to help understand how individuals adopt and use the Internet and other technologies, as well as the resulting social, economic, political and everyday-life implications.