See our past projects

  • GeoNet: Changing Connectivities and the Potentials of Sub-Saharan Africa’s Knowledge Economy

    Participants: Professor Mark Graham, Dr Stefano De Sabbata, Nicolas Friederici, Dr Christopher Foster, Sanna Ojanperä, Dr Mohammad Amir Anwar, Dr Fabian Braesemann, Michel Wahome

    This research project is examining the geographies, drivers, and effects of Sub-Saharan Africa's emerging information economies at a time of changing connectivity and Internet access across the region.

  • Internet Geographies Leverhulme Prize

    Participants: Prof Mark Graham, Dr Martin Dittus

    As digital augmentations of our world become ever more embedded into everyday life, this project asks where they are, what they are, and who owns, controls, and can shape them.

  • Mapping Playful Spaces in the Museum

    Participants: Dr Kathryn Eccles, Dr Chico Camargo

    This project seeks to use social media data to enhance our understanding of ‘playful’ behaviour across Oxford’s gardens, libraries, and museums, looking for new types of visitor engagement.

  • SciShops: Enhancing the Responsible and Sustainable Expansion of the Science Shops Ecosystem in Europe

    Participants: Professor Ralph Schroeder

    This project aims to expand and build upon the Science Shop ecosystem that currently exists in Europe and beyond.

  • Building Robust Evidence-Based Policy for Children in the Digital Age

    Participants: Professor Andrew Przybylski

    This project seeks to improve fundamentally the evidence stakeholders will depend on when crafting youth technology policy in the UK in order to address the current gap between research and policy.

  • Understanding the potential of AI in lifelong learning: A critical perspective

    Participants: Professor Rebecca Eynon, Dr Huw Davies

    This project seeks to discover the potential of artificial intelligence to personalise informal learning opportunities for adults across the life course.

  • Social media narratives of sustainable food consumption

    Participants: Dr Taha Yasseri, Mary Sanford

    This project uses computational social science to understand the dissemination and reception of narratives of sustainable food consumption on Social Media.

  • Political Volatility

    Participants: Professor Helen Margetts, Dr Scott Hale, Dr Chico Camargo, Dr Myrto Pantazi, Professor Peter John

    This project seeks to quantify trends and changes in the volatility of public opinion before and after widespread use of social media, and to study how social information can drive public opinion.

  • VOX-Pol Network of Excellence

    Participants: Dr Jonathan Bright, Dr Bharath Ganesh

    The VOX-Pol research project is designed to comprehensively research, analyse, debate, and critique issues surrounding violent online political extremism (VOPE).

  • TRANSNET: Forecasting and understanding transport network resilience and anomalies

    Participants: Dr Scott A. Hale, Dr Jonathan Bright, Dr Graham McNeill, Chico Camargo

    This project seeks to utilise newly available data to help urban policy makers improve transport infrastructure to cope with growing and increasingly mobile populations.

  • The Cultural Origins of Village Social Structure

    Participants: Dr Cohen R. Simpson

    Using data on face-to-face friendship between adult residents of dozens of rural villages in China, this project investigates whether the expression of mechanisms of network formation (e.g., reciprocity and transitivity) varies across environments.

  • Skills formation and skills matching in online platform work: Practices and policies for promoting crowdworkers’ continuous learning (CrowdLearn)

    Participants: Professor Vili Lenhdonvirta, Professor Anoush Margaryan, Dr Huw C. Davies, Laura Larke, Sian Brooke, Julian Albert

    Despite the rapid growth of online platform labour, little is known about how crowdworkers acquire and develop their skills. This project seeks to address this important gap in our knowledge.

  • Understanding the Psychological Well Being of Disadvantaged Children across the UK in the Digital Age

    Participants: Professor Andrew Przybylski, Dr Amy Orben

    This project explores whether vulnerable and less privileged children are more or less likely to be adversely affected by digital technology use. This combines the analysis of large-scale datasets with that of longitudinal datasets to examine causality.

  • OXLab: Oxford eXperimental Laboratory

    Participants: Professor Helen Margetts, Dr Tobias Escher, Dr Nir Vulkan, Dr Scott A. Hale, Ingrid Boxall, Professor Peter John, Lucy Bartlett

    Oxford eXperimental Laboratory is undertaking laboratory-based experiments (eg information-seeking tasks) on networked computers in two disciplines: Economics (interactive decision making) and Political Science (evaluating government information online).

  • Child Protection

    Participants: Dr Victoria Nash, Dr Monica Bulger, Dr Vera Slavtcheva-Petkova

    Work and activities by OII faculty and associates on issues surrounding online child safety and protection.

  • OxDEG: The Oxford Digital Ethnography Group

    Participants: Professor Eric T. Meyer, Dr Heather Ford, John McManus, Shireen Walton, Dr William Kelly

    OxDEG, the Oxford Digital Ethnography Group, comprises students and faculty members from Oxford University who discuss and share ideas about the evolution of ethnography in a heavily mediated world.

  • Elections and the Internet

    Participants: Professor Helen Margetts, Dr Scott A. Hale, Dr Jonathan Bright

    This site collects elections research at the OII. We are interested in exploring the extent to which data from the social web can be used to predict interesting social and political phenomena, especially elections.

  • Turing Institute

    Participants:

    We are a contributing department to the Alan Turing Institute (ATI), which will place the UK at the forefront of world-wide research in data science.

  • WIP: World Internet Project

    Participants: Professor William H. Dutton, Dr Grant Blank

    The World Internet Project (WIP) carries out panel surveys in over twenty countries to help understand how individuals adopt and use the Internet and other technologies, as well as the resulting social, economic, political and everyday-life implications.

  • Government on the Web

    Participants: Professor Helen Margetts, Dr Tobias Escher, Dr Scott A. Hale, Simon Bastow, Professor Patrick Dunleavy, Oliver Pearce, Jane Tinkler

    Research dedicated to improving knowledge and understanding of e-government and the impact of web-based technologies on government.