This one-day workshop will showcase digital crowdsourcing projects in the Arts and Humanities, and discuss the impact of such initiatives. ‘Impact’ is a broad term, which encompasses issues connected to community, digital curation, public engagement and knowledge exchange. Key questions will include:

  • What does impact mean in this environment?

  • What types of impacts can be achieved by crowdsourcing initiatives?

  • How can crowdsourced resources balance quality control and peer review?

  • What are the impacts of devolving key processes away from core teams and institutions to public participants?

  • What impacts do crowdsourcing initiatives have on participants and to what extent is it possible to influence this?

The workshop is aimed at:

  • Crowdsourcing projects in the arts and humanities

  • Academics and students interested in researching crowdsourcing

  • Digital humanities scholars interested in the role of crowdsourcing in knowledge exchange and public engagement

  • Institutional staff interested in launching crowdsourcing activities

  • Representatives of funding and evaluation bodies

Please note that there are up to 80 places available. There is a registration fee to cover lunch and refreshments:

  • Early bird registration (before 15th March): £20

  • Registration after 15th March: £25

  • Students wishing to attend can request a waiver of the registration fee by emailing: events@oii.ox.ac.uk

Please note that registration fees will only be refunded if we are notified of cancellations before Friday 15th March. To notify us of any cancellations, please contact events@oii.ox.ac.uk.

The hashtag to use for tweeting about this event is: #oxcrowd

Programme

Programme

10:00

Welcome

10:05

“An emerging field(?): defining the fundamentals of humanities crowdsourcing”

Stuart Dunn, King’s College London

10.40

“Your Paintings: putting 211,000 paintings in the public domain”

“The Your Paintings Tagger: crowdsourcing descriptive metadata for the Your Paintings project”

Alice Warley, Public Catalogue Foundation, Your Paintings and Andrew Greg, University of Glasgow, Your Paintings

11.15

Coffee

11:30

“Crowdsourcing the past: The Oxford Community Collection Model”

Kate Lindsay, Manager for Engagement & Education Enhancement, University of Oxford

12:00

“Art Maps: crowdsourcing as engagement mechanism”

Laura Carletti, University of Nottingham, Tate Art Maps.

12:30

“TBC”

Kimberly Kowal, British Library, Georeferencer.

13:00

Lunch

14:00

“‘A thousand readers are wanted, and confidently asked for’: public participation as engagement in the arts and humanities”

Mia Ridge, Open University.

14:30

“Crowdsourcing at scale – from Oxyrhynchus to Flanders with the Zooniverse”

Chris Lintott, University of Oxford, Zooniverse.

15:00

“‘If we can crowdsource Bentham, can we crowdsource anything?’ The impacts of Transcribe Bentham and collaborative transcription”

Tim Causer, UCL, Transcribe Bentham

15:30

Coffee

15:45

“Crowdsourcing in the Arts and Humanities: Roundtable discussion”

17:00

Close

This event is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

About the speakers

This page was last modified on 28 June 2016