This project, initiated as part of Becta's major programme of research in support of the Government's Harnessing Technology strategy, looked at the learning opportunities afforded by young people's uses of new technologies in their everyday lives.

This project, initiated as part of Becta’s major programme of research in support of the Government’s Harnessing Technology strategy in the UK, looked at the learning opportunities afforded by young people’s uses of new technologies in their everyday lives. The focus of the research was to investigate how young people use technologies in their own contexts, away from formal education, with a particular focus on how they use those technologies in support of their learning.

The study has examined the experiences of learners right across the range of formal education, from primary school up to further and higher education, including those in non-mainstream settings such as learners in special schools, and looked after children. Where appropriate, the research also connected with parents, carers, employers and those responsible for policy implementation in local authorities.

The research incorporated a range of methods including: interviews with around 150 young people (aged 8-22, in years 4, 8, 10, FE and HE), discussing with them their experiences with new technologies in and out of school / college / university; 35 home case study visits, a nationally representative survey of 1069 young people in their homes and a series of in-depth studies of particular groups of young people, including those in families without extensive access to ICTs at home; vulnerable learners including Looked After Children and SEN learners; higher education students on vocational as well as those on non-vocational degrees; recent recruits into the workplace and their employers.

Teenagers and technology

Books

Presentations

  • Eynon, R. and Malmberg, L. (2011) Understanding the online information seeking behaviours of young people. 14th Biennial EARLI Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction, August-September 2011, Exeter, UK.

Reports

  • UK teenagers without the internet are ‘educationally disadvantaged’

    Date Published: 22 December 2012

    Source: University of Oxford

    A major in-depth study by Dr Chris Davies and Dr Rebecca Eynon, shows that teenagers with no access to the internet are disadvantaged both educationally and socially.

  • Teenagers who don’t have internet access at home are ‘missing out educationally and socially’

    Date Published: 31 December 2012

    Source: Daily Mail

    The Daily Mail features the work of Rebecca Eynon and Chris Davis which shows that young people without internet access are at significant disadvantage relative to their peers. The work is published in a new book 'Teenagers and Technology'.

  • Teens with no internet access educationally disadvantaged

    Date Published: 31 December 2012

    Source: Business Standard, India

    Teenagers with no access to the internet are disadvantaged educationally and socially according to OII Research Fellow Rebecca Eynon and education researcher Chris Davies.  The benefits of technology outweigh the risks despite popular perceptions.

  • Teens with no internet access educationally disadvantaged

    Date Published: 31 December 2012

    Source: The Hindu, India

    Teenagers with no access to the internet are disadvantaged educationally and socially according to OII Research Fellow Rebecca Eynon and education researcher Chris Davies.  The benefits of technology outweigh the risks despite popular perceptions.

  • Study: Teenagers without web access are left ‘educationally disadvantaged’

    Date Published: 2 January 2013

    Source: Wired.co.uk

    Teenagers with no access to the internet are disadvantaged educationally and socially according to OII Research Fellow Rebecca Eynon and education researcher Chris Davies. The benefits of technology outweigh the risks despite popular perceptions.

  • A third of poorest pupils ‘without internet at home’

    Date Published: 4 January 2013

    Source: BBC News, Education and Family

    Rebecca Eynon is quoted as saying that research carried out for recently published book ‘Teenagers and Technology’ which she co-authored confirms that disconnected young people are at a distinct disadvantage.

  • Pupils are disadvantaged if they don’t have internet access at home

    Date Published: 11 January 2013

    Source: The Guardian

    Chris Davies argues that computers and internet access are so integral to the way teenagers study at home that those without are at a distinct disadvantage and need extra support.  He is co-author with Rebecca Eynon of ‘Teenagers and Technology’.