Laura Pinkerton

Laura Pinkerton is a social theorist. She uses qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Email: laura.pinkerton@oii.ox.ac.uk

Laura Pinkerton is a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute and a DPhil student in the Learning and New Technologies Research Group at the University of Oxford’s Department of Education.

Laura’s research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and computing, especially as they are occurring in the implementation of England’s new National Curriculum computing standards. She is also interested generally in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world.

She holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz and completed an MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at the University of Oxford in 2015. Prior to coming to the UK, Laura worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

Research Interests:

computing education policy; digital, media, and information literacies; socio-cultural structures; the translation of educational policy into practice.

Positions held at the OII:

  • Research Assistant, May 2018 –

Current projects

Past projects

  • Tackling Digital Inequality Amongst Young People: The Home Internet Access Initiative

    Participants: Professor Rebecca Eynon, Dr Huw C. Davies, Laura Pinkerton

    This participatory research project explores a two year initiative that provides all year 10 students with a laptop and Internet connection if they require one at home in three secondary schools.

  • Transmedia Literacy

    Participants: Professor Rebecca Eynon, Dr Cristobal Cobo, Dr Huw C. Davies, Laura Pinkerton

    The transliteracy project aims to examine how young people use technology to learn outside formal educational settings.

Conference papers

  • Pinkerton, L.R. (2018) Big Tech’s privatization of schools: a case study of computing education in England. BSA Digital Sociology Study Group Event (ACM WebSci'18).. BSA Digital Sociology Study Group Event (ACM WebSci'18), VU Amsterdam, 26 May 2018.
  • Pinkerton, L.R. (2018) Failure to disrupt: the impact of England's national computing curriculum on primary schools. 2018 British Educational Research Association Annual Conference.. 2018 British Educational Research Association Annual Conference, Northumbria University, Newcastle, 11 – 13 September 2018.
  • Pinkerton, L.R., Elmehairy, K., Petrovai, K. and Talks, I. (2018) Agency, technology, and education: a Learning & New Technologies Research Group panel. 2018 STORIES: Technology Matters Conference.. 2018 STORIES: Technology Matters Conference, University of Oxford, 12 – 13 March 2018. Oxford.
  • Pinkerton, L.R. (2017) Belief, judgement, and the computing classroom: how teaching professionals translate policy into practice. 2017 British Educational Research Association Annual Conference.. 2017 British Educational Research Association Annual Conference, University of Sussex, Brighton, 5 – 7 September 2017. British Educational Research Association Conference 2017.
  • Basnet, S., Cleary, A.M., Golenhofen, F., Huang, J., Jiang, D., Köster, A.J., Martelli, D., Oyewole, A., Paes, T., Pinkerton, L.R., Pinto, V., Turu, M. and Watkins, M. (2016) Proceedings of the 2016 STORIES Conference: i2i – Inquiry to Impact. STORIES Conference, Department of Education, University of Oxford, 15 March – 16 October 2016. Oxford: Oxford: STORIES Conference. 1-106.
  • Moorthy, S., Pinkerton, L.R., Llorente, C., Christiano, E.R., Hupert, N. and Rizzo, A.A. (2014) Digital learning in early childhood education: possibilities and points of entry. 2014 American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting.. 2014 American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 3 – 7 April 2014. 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association.

Internet publications

  • Pinkerton, L.R. (2017) How gaming in the classroom prepares children for life in a surveillance state. The Conversation.