Leadership is passion to improve our world. This interactive, public discussion will consider the nature of leadership in a ubiquitous internet era as well as the nature of leadership in existing public institutions in contrast to startup organizations.

Leadership is passion to improve our world. This interactive, public discussion will consider the nature of leadership in a ubiquitous internet era as well as the nature of leadership in existing public institutions in contrast to startup organizations. In contrast to the private sector, public institutions frequently must provide equitable access to information and technology-based services to all, not specific audience segments. Public institutions also often must comply with detailed rules and regulations written to prevent the aggregation of too much power or authority, whereas startups often are exploring new ideas without pre-written rules or regulations. Since a thriving private sector requires a similar investment in a thriving public sector, new approaches to civic innovation are required for 21st century, networked institutions.

Future public institutions will be increasingly mobile, modular, and measurable with information technologies as a key driver to this transition. Ubiquitous internet will help transform public sectors if the right approaches to navigating, surviving, and thriving in the midst of transition are adopted. Already the “consumerization” of devices has impacted several government organizations. Public sector professionals are looking to work anywhere, any time and on any device. Future public institutions will need to facilitate a secure mobile workforce through proper IT investments. In addition, by improving the way government engages with citizens by leveraging data in new ways, government can become more proactive in meeting citizen demand. Successfully transforming public institutions to adopt ubiquitous internet requires (1) moving forward with forethought, and (2) building a coalition of partners.

This will be an interactive, open discussion talk. The ideas and views shared during this talk represent the speaker’s own and do not necessarily represent the views of nor should they be attributed to any government agency; no official endorsement is implied.